The Internet Is Making Us Lose Trust In Our Doctors

How well do you trust your doctor?

Is seems that, at least for parents, a level of trust might be impacted by exposure to on-line medical information.  A study presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies suggests that doctor / patient trust and the drive to a second opinion–in a digital age–might be more fragile than we thought.  In this study, 1,374 parent participants were presented with a vignette of a child who ‘has had a rash and worsening fever for 3 days.’ The participants were divided into three groups and the first two were presented with information related to the symptoms as computer screen shots.

  • Group one was presented with screen shots of clinical information on scarlet fever.
  • Group two was presented with screen shots of clinical information on Kawasaki Disease (a condition that causes inflammation in the walls of blood vessels).
  • Group three received no internet screenshots.

After which, all three groups were informed that that physician had diagnosed the child with scarlet fever and then asked to rate their level of trust in the diagnosis from 1 (Not at all) to 7 (Completely). Parents were also asked to rate their likelihood of seeking a second opinion regarding the diagnosis, from 1 (Extremely Unlikely) to 7 (Extremely Likely).

Physician and Patient Trust

With permission. Ruth Malanaik

Source: Ruth Malaniak MD

The results suggest that prior exposure to information can ‘prime’ a parent to have a unique bias. This bias can impact the trust that has been established with a physician and even change the care pathway.  And this result was supported statistically–the three cohorts significantly differed in reported trust in the doctors’ diagnosis (p < .001) and reported likelihood of seeking a second opinion.  The authors concluded:

After reading online search results, parents were more inclined to trust their doctor’s Dx (diagnosis) when online information supported their doctor Dx and less inclined when information contradicted the doctor. Parents were also more likely to seek a SO (second opinion) if internet results contradicted the doctor Dx. Although it is imperative that parents participate in the medical decision-making process, conflicting online information could in some cases delay necessary medical treatment. Physicians must be aware of the influence the internet may have on parents and ensure adequate parental education to address any possible concerns.

While this ‘artificial’ scenario may not accurately reflect everyday life or clinical practice, the results seem to indicate that exposure to clinical information on-line may ‘prime’ parents to particular point of view and predisposition to action. I’m reminded of work done by John Bargh, a social psychologist who studied how people, given prior exposure to information, can have that point of view reflected in their subsequent opinion or actions. This concept was popularized by Malcolm Gladwell in his best selling book Blink.

In this study, we can see how information obtained on-line can directly impact the caregivers’ perceptions of decisions and recommendations of a physician.  Dr. Ruth Milaniak MD, the lead investigator of this study, supports this observation and offers some important advice.

Every time I speak with my patients, I always have in the back of my mind what on-line influence may have already impacted our dialogue.  The internet is emerging as ‘the elephant exam room’ and we as clinicians need to understand this and communicate with patients and caregivers accordingly.

In an era where doctor / patient communication can be time-limited, the role of on-line support may play and increasing role. And as more and more, patients look to Dr. Google as a primary source of medical information, the key question that emerges is if that ‘digital information’ helps or hurts clinical care.

Follow me @JohnNosta for a more informed and healthy future.

 

The Internet Is Freaking Out Over These Zendaya And Tom Holland Dating Rumors

ATTENTION, HUMANITY: I may or may not have very good news for you regarding Spider-Man stars Tom Holland and Zendaya.

But first, let me make something absolutely clear: The things I am about to share with you are just rumors. So please, do not purchase your wedding outfit just yet.

Carlos Alvarez / Getty Images

But first, let me make something absolutely clear: The things I am about to share with you are just rumors. So please, do not purchase your wedding outfit just yet.

So, here’s the deal: According to People, Zendaya and Tom Holland are ~*~DATING~*~.

Robert Marquardt / Getty Images

Here’s some exclusive footage of me when I first read that news:

Nickelodeon

But again, none of this is official. An anonymous source told People:

They started seeing each other while they were filming Spider-Man. They’ve been super careful to keep it private and out of the public eye but they’ve gone on vacations with each other and try and spend as much time as possible with one another.

And a second source added:

They’re both really ambitious and they challenge each other — but, most importantly, they make each other crack up. They seem to have a really similar sense of humor and love joking around together. They have great banter back and forth.

Now, as a person whose only hobby is watching hot, smart people kiss, I was very excited about this prospect!!!

Kevin Winter / Getty Images

But so far, Zendaya and Tom are mostly laughing off the rumors. Zendaya just tweeted:

And Tom even posted this lovely Instagram yesterday — captioning it #lonerlife. Does a boy with a girlfriend use the hashtag #lonerlife?

STILL. I can’t help but notice that their tweets aren’t really a denial. They’re just kinda… laughing at it?

Harpo Productions

And if it WAS true, Zendaya and Tom would actually be following in the footsteps of their Spider-Man predecessors. Dating your Spider-Man co-star is a tradition dating all the way back to 2002.

Tim P. Whitby / Getty Images

Tobey Maguire and Kirsten Dunst dated while filming their 2002 Spider-Man series, as did Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield while filming theirs in 2012.

Well, true or not, you have to admit this pairing would be cute as hell. ADD THIS SHIT TO YOUR VISION BOARDS, PEOPLE.

Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg’s dream for education is for kids to learn mostly without teachers

 

Microsoft peddles laptops. Google touts services such as collaborative calendars and spreadsheet-making software. After building their businesses on products that students use, it’s not surprising that tech giants—from actual computer companies to other Silicon Valley darlings like Salesforce and Netflix—are wedging their way into education itself, especially as the US market for education technology is predicted to bloom to $21 billion by 2020. Most tech leaders are getting in by making learning apps, donating to policy campaigns, or partnering with individual schools.

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has a slightly different, and much more audacious, idea.

Zuckerberg’s goal is for “a billion students” across the world to be able to learn on their own, via software that his company helps build, with teachers merely looking over their shoulders. As the New York Times (paywall) describes it it:Facebook CEO and Harvard dropout Mark Zuckerberg, center, greets graduating Harvard students as he walks in a procession though Harvard Yard at the start of Harvard University commencement exercises, Thursday, May 25, 2017, in Cambridge, Mass. Zuckerberg is giving a commencement address at Harvard, where he dropped out 12 years ago to focus on Facebook. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

It’s a conception that upends a longstanding teaching dynamic. Now educators are no longer classroom leaders, but helpmates. In public remarks and Facebook posts, Mr. Zuckerberg has described how it works. Students cluster together, working at laptops. They use software to select their own assignments, working at their own pace. And, should they struggle at teaching themselves, teachers are on hand to guide them.

In 2015, Zuckerberg and his wife, pediatrician Priscilla Chan, announced they will eventually give 99% of their Facebook shares to—among a few other causes—transforming education through technology. Their organization to accomplish that aim, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, said in March that it will offer a free online software for customizing classroom instruction by the end of the year. The tool “empowers teachers to customize instruction to meet their students’ individual needs and interests”—but its ultimate aim is to have teachers serve as mentors and evaluators, not instructors.

“It’s time for our generation-defining public works,” Zuckerberg said during his graduation speech at Harvard last month. “We can fix this. How about modernizing democracy so everyone can vote online, and personalizing education so everyone can learn?”

Of course, these plans are still more dreams than reality. What Zuckerberg hasn’t done so far is lay out his organization’s detailed path to those lofty goals.

BlackBerry is leveraging its most popular assets to tackle enterprise communications

This story was delivered to BI Intelligence Apps and Platforms Briefing subscribers. To learn more and subscribe, please click here.

On Monday, BlackBerry moved its BBM Enterprise SDK out of beta and is now offering the service to Android and iOS apps, according to VentureBeat.

Developers can use the SDK as a messaging infrastructure, allowing them to focus on building additional parts into their apps. The announcement is in line with BlackBerry’s recent services focus. The company’s turbulent relationship with hardware has forced it to shift focus to software and services over the past 18 months.

BlackBerry is leveraging its messaging app experience, from BBM, to give it an edge over rival enterprise communications companies, such as Twilio. BBM was once the crown jewel of the BlackBerry ecosystem, supporting a wide range of features including read receipts, file sharing, and message editing, as well as voice and video chat. The chat app has been touted as one of BlackBerry’s stickiest offerings.

Moreover, BBM’s strong ties to security could make it an appealing option for businesses. Encryption and cybersecurity continue to be hot topics in the enterprise, particularly as messaging becomes an increasingly important mode of communication, both between businesses and businesses, and businesses and customers. For example, Tundra Core Studios used the BBM SDK to build a messaging function into its app, something possible only due to BlackBerry’s stringent security features, VentureBeat notes.

Cloud computing — on-demand, internet-based computing services — has been successfully applied to many computing functions in recent years. From consumer-facing, web-based productivity apps like Google Docs to enterprise database management suites, the tools businesses rely on are increasingly moving to the cloud.Image result for BlackBerry is leveraging its most popular assets to tackle enterprise communications

But developing a cloud strategy is no easy task. Public cloud solutions will likely come to dominate the market over the next decade, but business constraints, such as security concerns and the limitations of existing infrastructure, make it difficult for companies to fully adopt the public cloud right now.

That means that hybrid clouds, in which multiple cloud implementations (including public and private) are connected, will remain popular for the time being, at least until these constraints are addressed. The tech giants that dominate the IaaS market — Amazon, IBM, Microsoft, and Google — are constantly expanding their offerings to address current business constraints as they compete for market share.

BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, has compiled a detailed report on cloud computing that:

  • Explains the different cloud computing strategies and benefits of cloud computing.
  • Evaluates key business considerations – security needs, demand predictability, existing infrastructure, and maintenance capabilities – for enterprises choosing between cloud implementations..

 

Is Nokia Ready to Take India by Storm?

 

This episode of Orbital focuses on Nokia’s new smartphone launches. Nokia launched three Android phones – Nokia 3, Nokia 5, and Nokia 6. These three Android phones have been hotly anticipated but will they be able to make a mark in a market where there are so many good mid-range Android phones? Games editor Rishi Alwani and “former” host Pranay Parab join host Aditya Shenoy to discuss.

We start the episode by talking about the three Nokia smartphones and whether the hardware matches up against what the competition has to offer. We look at the specifications of the three Nokia smartphones and wonder whether they can take on excellent mid-range and budget smartphones from rivals.Is Nokia Ready to Take India by Storm?

Nokia’s distribution strategy is also a big point of discussion. We wonder why Nokia 3 and Nokia 5 are offline exclusive and why Nokia 6 is an Amazon exclusive. Rishi and Pranay offer theories about this, before we look at Nokia’s official comments on its strategy.
Then Aditya brings up the topic of after sales service. We talk about how difficult it is to provide good service and whether Nokia can differentiate itself from competition on this front. Finally, we close the episode by talking about Nokia’s naming strategy for its smartphones.

 

Kingdom Come: Deliverance is like an ultra-realistic Skyrim set in the Holy Roman Empire

Kingdom Come: Deliverance has positioned itself as a “realistic Elder Scrolls game.” Taking the first-person viewpoint, the wide-open world, and the get-better-at-a-skill-by-using-it talent system, there are definite similarities.

Just leave all the magic and dragons and whatever behind. Kingdom Come: Deliverance is a period drama set in the Holy Roman Empire of the early 1400s, within the kingdom of Bohemia. You play the lazy son of a master blacksmith whose village is invaded and burned to the ground by King Sigismund.

That really happened. King Sigismund did in fact invade this village and raze it, we were told during our demo. It’s excellent impetus for your own rags-to-riches adventure, but has basis in actual historical fact.

kingdom come deliverance 4

Kingdom Come: Deliverance

So “Realistic Elder Scrolls game” is perhaps understating the whole endeavor. It’s obsessive. Listening to Warhorse Studios describe Kingdom Come: Deliverance, it seems like a game tailor-made for history buffs. Every village in the game is an actual historical village in the 1400s. Most of the important characters were also pulled straight from history, with accompanying codex entries the length of a mini-encyclopedia hidden within the menus. Even the maps are done up in the style of the times, with a hand-drawn medieval look I don’t think I’ve seen used in a game before.

It’s like Assassin’s Creed without the accompanying layer of conspiracy theories, more a work of living history than a game in some regards.

Don’t get me wrong, though: It’s an ambitious game too. Our demo focused on the opening 30 minutes of the game, so we didn’t get to see much in the way of story. I pretty much spent my time hauling coal to my father’s forge and then helping him create a sword for the nearby lord.

kingdom come deliverance 2

Kingdom Come: Deliverance

But Warhorse did speak in broader terms about the world it’s building—one that’s a far more reactive take on the open-world RPG. For instance, an early quest tasked us with recovering a debt from a local drunkard. With the right stats we could of course talk the money out of him, or we could beat it out of him. If we fail in that regard, we could return and tell our father, at which point he’ll take care of it. Or if you keep exploring, you might find some other way around the quest, maybe some fellow youths to teach you how to break into the drunkard’s house.

Many of these quests are also time-limited, which further changes how events play out. Another early quest has you grab a beer for your father on the way home. “Get one from the cellar so it’s still cold,” he says as you dash off. Buy the beer and come back immediately and your dear ol’ dad will drink full to bursting. Get distracted, though? The beer warms up, and your dad will lament his lazy son again.

This is a minor example, but from the looks of it Kingdom Come is studded with time-sensitive events that lead to entire quests or quest paths, all sorts of people actually going about their lives and you’re just one more peasant in their midst. It’s very A Mind Forever Voyaging in that regard, or Pathologic—the latter another Elder Scrolls-alike, actually.

kingdom come deliverance 6

Kingdom Come: Deliverance

You can even lock yourself out of quests entirely. Warhorse stated that it wants the main quest to be modular, easily completed no matter the path you choose, but side quests can end at any moment, either before you’ve even started or (if you really screw up) right in the middle of one. If you’re feeling truly sadistic you can even kill quest givers. That’s one way to fail.

Then there are the small touches I’ve already come to love. Saving the game requires drinking alcohol, and only a certain amount can be carried at a time, limiting the amount of save-scumming. And if you wear a helmet into a battle the screen occludes appropriately—you’ll get a narrow band of vision in the middle, surrounded by black.

 

The Ryzen 7 1700X is less than $300 at Walmart right now

 

Today you can get a high-end AMD Ryzen 7 CPU for less than $300 if you’re willing to put in a little physical effort. The processor in question is the Ryzen 7 1700X, an eight-core, 3.4GHz processor.

This particular price can be found at Walmart. While you can also grab the 1700X on sale at Newegg ($350 until midnight PDT), Walmart has an extra discount available for people willing to head to a store. As Slickdeals points out, if you opt for in-store pickup, the retailer will drop another $59.38 off the sale price of $355. That’s a final cost of about $296.

The Ryzen 7 1700X has a 3.4GHz clock speed with a max boost of 3.8GHz, and it features eight cores, 16 threads, and a TDP of 95W. It doesn’t come with a fan, though, so you’ll have to pick-up your own CPU cooler. We usually recommend the Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo, since it’s cheap and effective.

 ryzen box 1 of 1

Not a whole lot has changed with the Ryzen 7 series since we looked at it last. They’re fantastic for tasks such as productivity and content creation, but the chips aren’t quite as fast as Intel’s Kaby Lake chips in gaming. Still, they’re fine processors nonetheless, and getting even better with updates.

If you do go for this deal make sure you check out our tutorial on 7 tips and tricks to maximize your PC’s performance with AMD Ryzen.

ryzen1700xAM

[ Today’s deal: The Ryzen 7 1700X for $350 at Newegg and $296 at Walmart with in-store pickup ]

Sony consolidating its flagships is probably for the best

 

Despite not performing as well as many of the other big brands in the smartphone business, Sony has made it clear that it will stick it out in the handset market. The latest reports suggest that the company has two more flagship models heading our way this year.

While still unconfirmed, it appears that Sony is looking to consolidate its premium tier of smartphones with its upcoming releases. A move that I believe not only makes financial sense, but is likely to help the company’s struggling brand awareness too. Even if this means that a few consumer favourites, such as the Compact range, may be sacrificed.

Xperia XYZ

Sony has long been criticized for releasing too many smartphones, and this goes right back to the days of the Z1, Z3, and Z3+, etc. Arguably, the situation has become even more confusing in the past year or so, following Sony’s adoption of its Premium and Performance branding.

400 quatloos to whoever can detail the differences between the Xperia XZ, XZs, XZ Premium, X Compact, X Performance, and the regular X model off the top of their head.

400 quatloos to whoever can detail the differences between the Xperia XZ, XZs, XZ Premium, X Compact, X Performance, and the regular X model off the top of their head. Remember, that’s just over one year’s worth of premium tier releases from Sony. While we enthusiasts have the benefit of breaking down spec sheets for fun, imagine how bewildering this range would look stacked up on a physical store display. How would you pick?

It’s no wonder that marketing seems completely absent for so many of Sony’s phones, yet a clear cut message and notable differentiation is essential when trying to market premium tier products to consumers. By cutting out its “Premium Standard” models – which includes the Xperia X and X Compact – Sony will almost certainly see an improvement to consumer understanding of its product range. This instantly helps with marketing and will importantly make its product range easier to breakdown and compare to other flagship models.

That being said, releasing four premium tier products a year is still probably a couple too many. Although if there’s a notable differentiation between some of them, such as a Compact or Phablet model released part way through the year ala LG’s V series or Samsung’s Note, then this might just fly.

It’s time to cut costs

Furthermore, eliminating the diversity of its top-tier products could be a sensible cost cutting measure for a company whose mobile division pulls in considerably less revenue than the likes of Apple and Samsung. We know that Sony Mobile has been underperforming financially for a while now, so this is a much needed move.

Even if Sony doesn’t actually cut down the number of high-end products it releases each year, it’s still looking like four, manufacturing phones with more components in common saves hugely on costs. Component stock can be shared between models, meaning that Sony won’t get caught out holding a lot of mid-tier processors if a phone doesn’t sell. Similarly, software development and support costs and times are lowered, as chip and hardware feature implementations can be shared.

Currently, across Sony’s Premium Standard and Flagship models you’ll find a Snapdragon 650, 820, and 835, combined with a selection of 4K, 1080p, and 720p panels and various Quick Charge implementations. Distilling this down to a single core specification but packaged in different sized units, as Samsung is does with the S8 and S8 Plus, would be more cost effective. But we’ll have to wait and see if that’s actually what Sony has planned.

The drawbacks

Of course, such a move makes it inevitable that some of Sony’s more interesting products will disappear. The Compact range remains a favourite of those who want a powerful phone in a small form factor, but it’s always been a more niche product than more profitable phablets. It’s likely that the Compact range will be a casualty if Sony follows through with this plan, unless the company makes an unlikely move and releases a sub 5-inch flagship as one of its two releases reportedly planned for later in the year.

The Compact range remains a favourite of those who want a powerful phone in a small form factor, but it’s likely to be a casualty of Sony’s reshuffle.

Similarly, the value proposition of the Xperia X also looks set to disappear. While this diversity is part of Sony’s problem, there’s something to be said about offering a cost competitive alternative to the big players in order to gain market share. I don’t know how well this would work out for Sony as a Plan A, but the overshadowed Xperia X didn’t exactly seem like a solid commitment that we could use to gauge consumer appetite from. Sony would clearly rather view itself competing at the premium tier rather than fighting it out in the bargain bin.

These and other interesting products, such as the Z Ultra, have previously helped Sony stand out, and there is a risk that simply copying the a formula used by others could cause Sony’s Xperia handsets to become further lost in the crowd, especially if the hardware isn’t all that different between generations.

Could Sony consolidate further?

Perhaps then, simply reshuffling its flagship models doesn’t go far enough to revamp the company’s image and portfolio in a way that will make a meaningful difference. In reality, it looks like Sony is essentially going back to its previous method of two major announcements a year, which will probably be just as infuriating as it was with the Xperia Z series.

Instead, I think Sony could do with being bolder, releasing yet fewer products but with a clearer purpose to each. Really, only one major flagship per year is required, with perhaps a secondary product released to maintain momentum. Apple, Samsung, LG, and to a lesser extent Huawei have done quite well using this model.

I would quite happily take a bells and whistles flagship Xperia launch at the start of the year, followed up by a compelling aggressively priced S or Compact model part way through the year to cater to those who didn’t fancy splashing the cash on one of the year’s flagships. Two meaningful handsets that don’t cannibalize each other and that could be marketed with a suitable budget to finally give the brand some much needed recognition. But what do I know?

 

Samsung Galaxy Note 8 render hits the web, price is also out

 

From the image below, you can see that the screen-to-body ratio of the Galaxy Note 8 is better than that of the flagship smartphones – Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+. We have already come across this information, thanks to a previous leak. Also, the latest leaked render suggests that the Galaxy Note 8 will have a 6.3-inch display that goes in line with the previous rumors. This screen is believed to have a QHD 1440p resolution. But the chances to expect a 4K display are high if Samsung wants to focus on VR. The latest leak suggests that the Galaxy Note 8 might be priced around €999 (approx. Rs. 72,000). At such a premium price point, it is possible for the device to arrive with a 4K display. Another noticeable feature is the rear-mounted fingerprint sensor, which wasn’t seen on the previous leaks. It seems to be positioned under the dual-lens rear camera setup. Samsung is believed to make use of two 12MP camera sensors at the back with OIS. Talking about the other details as tipped by the previous speculations, the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 slated to be unveiled in late August ahead of IFA 2017 is likely to feature Snapdragon 836 SoC. The upcoming chipset is claimed to be paired with either 6GB or 8GB RAM and up to 256GB of default memory capacity. The other aspects include a 3300mAh battery and DeX support as well.

 

Sony Xperia XZ Premium is now part of Open Devices program: Know what this means

 

What this means is that Sony is now allowing people especially developers to test, develop and also flash their own version of Android Nougat on the Xperia XZ Premium. The company says that the Open Devices program is meant for developers and not for consumers. However, the company also puts out a warning saying that the software provided can be unstable due to its early stage.

So going with developers might be a wise choice. Further, Sony says that it is offering guides on how to use the company’s AOSP device configurations to build a unique version of Android Nougat and flash it on unlocked Xperia device. However, developers will need to remember to download the necessary software binaries before they begin the development process. “As you may know, the Open Devices program is our way to provide access and tools to build and test your custom software on a range of Sony devices.

You can access all the resources you need through our Open Devices page on Developer World. We value our open source community and welcome you to participate in our projects via GitHub. Feel free to provide feedback on further resources you may need and where we can improve,” says the company.

This is really good for developers who are building an AOSP for the first time. New developers in the scene can always get started by following the guide provided by Sony.