The Internet Is Making Us Lose Trust In Our Doctors

How well do you trust your doctor?

Is seems that, at least for parents, a level of trust might be impacted by exposure to on-line medical information.  A study presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies suggests that doctor / patient trust and the drive to a second opinion–in a digital age–might be more fragile than we thought.  In this study, 1,374 parent participants were presented with a vignette of a child who ‘has had a rash and worsening fever for 3 days.’ The participants were divided into three groups and the first two were presented with information related to the symptoms as computer screen shots.

  • Group one was presented with screen shots of clinical information on scarlet fever.
  • Group two was presented with screen shots of clinical information on Kawasaki Disease (a condition that causes inflammation in the walls of blood vessels).
  • Group three received no internet screenshots.

After which, all three groups were informed that that physician had diagnosed the child with scarlet fever and then asked to rate their level of trust in the diagnosis from 1 (Not at all) to 7 (Completely). Parents were also asked to rate their likelihood of seeking a second opinion regarding the diagnosis, from 1 (Extremely Unlikely) to 7 (Extremely Likely).

Physician and Patient Trust

With permission. Ruth Malanaik

Source: Ruth Malaniak MD

The results suggest that prior exposure to information can ‘prime’ a parent to have a unique bias. This bias can impact the trust that has been established with a physician and even change the care pathway.  And this result was supported statistically–the three cohorts significantly differed in reported trust in the doctors’ diagnosis (p < .001) and reported likelihood of seeking a second opinion.  The authors concluded:

After reading online search results, parents were more inclined to trust their doctor’s Dx (diagnosis) when online information supported their doctor Dx and less inclined when information contradicted the doctor. Parents were also more likely to seek a SO (second opinion) if internet results contradicted the doctor Dx. Although it is imperative that parents participate in the medical decision-making process, conflicting online information could in some cases delay necessary medical treatment. Physicians must be aware of the influence the internet may have on parents and ensure adequate parental education to address any possible concerns.

While this ‘artificial’ scenario may not accurately reflect everyday life or clinical practice, the results seem to indicate that exposure to clinical information on-line may ‘prime’ parents to particular point of view and predisposition to action. I’m reminded of work done by John Bargh, a social psychologist who studied how people, given prior exposure to information, can have that point of view reflected in their subsequent opinion or actions. This concept was popularized by Malcolm Gladwell in his best selling book Blink.

In this study, we can see how information obtained on-line can directly impact the caregivers’ perceptions of decisions and recommendations of a physician.  Dr. Ruth Milaniak MD, the lead investigator of this study, supports this observation and offers some important advice.

Every time I speak with my patients, I always have in the back of my mind what on-line influence may have already impacted our dialogue.  The internet is emerging as ‘the elephant exam room’ and we as clinicians need to understand this and communicate with patients and caregivers accordingly.

In an era where doctor / patient communication can be time-limited, the role of on-line support may play and increasing role. And as more and more, patients look to Dr. Google as a primary source of medical information, the key question that emerges is if that ‘digital information’ helps or hurts clinical care.

Follow me @JohnNosta for a more informed and healthy future.

 

Apple reportedly plans to perform 5G internet tests in Cupertino

Apple is planning to test next-generation wireless internet technology near its California headquarters, according to a experimental application signed today by the iPhone maker and disclosed by the FCC. The application, obtained by Business Insider, details Apple’s plans to test 5G internet speeds achievable only with what’s known as millimeter wave technology, or mmWave. This is the same type of technology that internet startup Starry uses to try and deliver gigabit Wi-Fi to homes.

“Apple Inc. seeks to assess cellular link performance in direct path and multi-path environments between base station transmitters and receivers using this spectrum,” reads the application, according to BI. “These assessments will provide engineering data relevant to the operation of devices on wireless carriers’ future 5G networks.”

Though 5G remains a somewhat nebulous concept because standards organizations have yet to formally classify it, the successor to LTE is broadly understood to be capable of gigabit speeds that rely on mmWave tech. Because mmWave transmits data at a higher frequency, and thus a smaller wavelength of between 30 GHz and 300 GHz, the technology is capable of reducing latency and expanding data transmission capacity. It also opens up possibilities for cutting down on antenna size and for packing more powerful multi-band antennas into a single device.

Generally speaking, we’re talking about internet speeds that are orders of magnitude higher than standard LTE. Of course, there are big technically challenges with mmWave that need to be solved, primarily that the signal has trouble traveling great distances and through a great many surface materials, including glass. Still, Apple seems intent on testing the technology for itself:

Apple intends to transmit from two fixed points located at Apple-controlled facilities in Cupertino and Milpitas, CA. These transmissions will be consistent with the parameters and equipment identified in Apple’s accompanying Form 442, and will include the use of a horn antenna with a half-power beamwidth of 20 degrees in the E-plane and H-plane and a downtilt between 20 – 25 degrees. Apple anticipates that it will conduct its experiments for a period not to exceed 12 months.

Apple would be handling only the hardware side of testing with relation to the construction of new iPhones — perhaps the company is also looking at a different smartphone modem supplier given its ongoing legal dispute with Qualcomm. On the other end, there’s still a significant amount of network infrastructure work that has to be completed on behalf of telecoms, chipmakers, and standards organizations before your next smartphone sports a new logo in the upper left corner. That might not happen for an other two or three years.

AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile have all announced plans to start testing faster versions of 4G LTE that should, in theory, help lay the groundwork for true 5G in the future. On the chip side, Samsung, Qualcomm, and Intel have all announced new hardware to support 5G speeds, while telecom standards organization 3GPP is working to release the first official 5G standards in the second half of 2017 with full-scale tests and deployments slated for 2019.

14 words and phrases you should not use in emails

One wrongly used word or phrase could show your email, and you, in a completely different light! These words make you sound rude or pretentious. Avoid them!

Words you shouldn’t use in emails

Words you shouldnt use in emails

With emails being the primary communication source between employers and employees, and business owners and clients, it is very important that you do not unknowingly use certain words that might offend the person on the other side or show you in a light which isn’t completely positive.

A wrongly used word might make or break a partnership. You need to make sure your message gets across in a positive manner and elicits a positive response in return rather than stoic silence. So, we all need to brush up on our email etiquettes to stay in tune with the digital communication norms.

Read: 10 basic email etiquettes you should know

Here are 15 words that you should not be using in emails along with certain replacements that you should consider:

1. Hey/Hi

Starting an email with just Hey or Hi gives a unprofessional impression. After all, you are not talking to an age old friend. If however, you have been conversing with the person for some time, you can add the name after Hi, or start the mail with just the name.

2. Literally

Most often than not, this word is used often and erroneously. It is not even a very important word to use and when used in a false context, it can lower your impression in the eyes of the person who reads your email. Literally is used to denote something as it exactly happened. So you cannot literally be melting in the heat, or literally be running around for 48 hours a day.

3. Kindly

This word has become old and antiquated. Replacing ‘kindly’ with please makes you sound more genuine and less Victorian.

4. Okay/Noted

One word reply to emails will make the sender feel unacknowledged and definitely won’t make him or her happy. No need to go the whole hog and write a whole paragraph, but a line with something like “Thank you <name>, I understood your concerns and they have been duly noted.” Or “Okay <name>, I will make the changes you asked for. Thank you!” will go a long way in improving your work relations through your digital communication skills.

5. Obviously

The word ‘obviously’ can come across as very condescending to the reader as it denotes that the writer is saying something that should have been obvious to the reader but somehow he/she isn’t smart enough to catch it. Omit it from your email.

6. But

This word is usually a prelude to a bad news or a negative statement coming up. For example, in the sentence ‘I would really like the meeting o go forward tomorrow, but I have an urgent event that needs to be covered’, the moment the reader reads ‘but’, he/she experiences an instant fall in expectations.

You can skip the word ‘but’ and write what you mean in a slightly different manner which doesn’t take down the reader’s expectation, such as: ‘I would really like the meeting to go forward tomorrow. Regrettably, I have an urgent event that needs to be covered.’

7. Utilise (and other technical terms)

Business jargon is expected in mails between business clients. However, they do make the reader lose interest and often skip over to the important parts. So, try to use simple language and facts which can make the reader feel you are right there in front of him/her explaining it verbally.

8. Apparently

When you say ‘apparently’, it sounds like you disagree with the comment coming after that. For example, ‘Apparently, the article was too long and I need to shorten it’ sounds like the article being long is someone else’s opinion and you do not agree to it. It sounds like you are questioning someone’s decision or showing your disapproval.

9. Me/ I

Use fewer words that point to you and more words which point to the email reader. Turn around sentences to use words like ‘you’ and ‘your’. This makes the email more important to the other person as it removes the focus from the email sender to the email receiver.

10. No

A direct no comes across as very offensive and rude in an email. If you are denying something, whether it be a meeting, an idea or an article to publish, provide context regarding why you are denying it. Usually you can do it without even using the word ‘no’. You can also add a sorry to the reason.

11. Fine

The word ‘fine’ has a dismissive tone to it and can often be mistaken for a negative connotation. It’s best to replace it with ‘good’ if you are using it to describe something positively. Rather than saying “Your idea is a fine one”, say “Your idea is a good one”. It sounds more positive. In case you have something negative to say, explain it properly rather than leaving your reader wondering what you actually mean with a one-worded reply.

12. Actually

This is another word which doesn’t have much of a use when writing emails. It might sound okay when you are speaking to someone verbally or having a face-to-face conversation, but it can come off as pretty rude in emails. For example: ‘I actually think it might be a good idea to wait for the scheme to be launched officially before we write about it’ sounds more conceited than ‘I think it might be a good idea to wait for the scheme to be launched officially before we write about it.’

13. Respectfully

This word makes you sound serious and sombre. It sounds like you are ‘respectfully’ taking a negative decision that is not going to help the reader. Omit this word for a softer touch to your mails.

14. Sincerely yours/ truly yours/very truly yours

These sign off phrases might have sounded okay in the Victorian era, but we hardly write any letters anymore and the terminology needs to be more professional in the digital era of emails. A simple sign off with ‘regards’ or ‘faithfully’ would work better in this case. Just pay attention to how familiar you are to the other person and use sign off terms accordingly.

The trick to writing a comfortable, readable email is to remove yourself from cliches and harsh professional tones, and instead opt for something more closer to home, with sincere words that are not totally business-like, but not too familiar either.

 

HTC Asks its Fan Community to Combat Online Criticism, Offers Merchandise in Return

HTC’s latest U11 has been received with mixed reactions by the Android community. With good audio but no headphone jack and a new-ish design that scraps years of HTC’s expertise with metal, many fans and spectators threw quite a bit of skepticism its way.

There are many arguments one could make to discredit or devalue HTC’s new product, from its hardware decisions to its gimmicky “squeezing” features — and HTC knows this, so it found a way to at least combat it on online boards, comments sections and other social battlefields. According to information from their VIP community, presented in a reddit post, HTC has taken to ask its community of fans to duke it out online against dissenters of the phone in what we can only describe as literal shilling.

Image Credit: u/ShadowCodeGaming

Elevate is HTC’s private online community, members-only, for the company’s “top fans” and supporters. To join Elevate, you must request access by emailing HTC, and telling them why you are “HTC’s most passionate fan”. With admission requirements like those, you’d expect HTC Elevate members to be quite dedicated indeed. After all, they are the ones getting the latest product news, opportunities to access exclusive events or partner with HTC, and have direct access to HTC team members. But now, they are asking their users to “mobilize and combat some of the negative things out there about the U11”. As seen in the screenshot above, provided by reddit user u/ShadowCodeGaming, HTC wants users to post regularly in comments sections of blogs and social media, and then report back to Elevate so that they can keep track of the shilling.Image result for HTC Asks its Fan Community to Combat Online Criticism, Offers Merchandise in Return

Of course, HTC is actually rewarding people who go through that trouble (though, to be honest, if you are in a VIP HTC community, you’d probably do it for free), as they’ll be sending out “swag goodies” here and there to people who participate. The company doesn’t shy away from the implication that it encourages a network of shills, by saying that such actions are “what [elevate members] do best”, and calls it “sharing the good word about all things HTC — fanboy preaching, essentially.

We hope that this operation is limited in scope, and we’ll certainly keep an eye out for Elevate members in our comments sections from now on.

 

Nubia Z17 mini With Dual Rear Camera Launched in India: Price, Release Date, Specifications, and More

 

Just a few days after launching the Nubia Z17 premium smartphone in China, ZTE brand Nubia has now announced the Z17 mini for the Indian market. The mid-ranged smartphone from Nubia is priced at Rs. 19,999 and will be exclusively available on Amazon India starting 12pm IST on June 12 in Black Gold colour with pre-registrations beginning today at www.nubiaz17mini.com.

To recall, the Nubia Z17 mini was launched in China back in April, in 4GB RAM and 6GB RAM variants. The company has only brought the former to India. In terms of design, the Nubia Z17 mini looks identical to the Z17, only with a smaller 5.2-inch full-HD (1080×1920) display with 424ppi and Gorilla Glass on top. Similar to Z17, the Nubia Z17 mini features a slim form factor with almost no bezels on the the left and right sides of the display. The smartphone features a metal unibody design with a dual rear camera setup on the back along with a fingerprint sensor.

Since the Nubia Z17 mini is a slightly stripped down version of the premium variant, you’ll find that it is powered by a 64-bit octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 652 processor coupled with 4GB of RAM. Nubia Z17 mini With Dual Rear Camera Launched in India: Price, Release Date, Specifications, and MoreThe dual camera setup on the back feature a pair of 13-megapixel Sony sensors (Monochrome + RGB) with f/2.2 aperture, NeoVision 6.0 and protected by Sapphire Glass. The front sees a 16-megapixel camera with 80-degree wide angle, 5P lens, and f/2.0 aperture. The smartphone runs on Nubia UI 4.0 based on Android Marshmallow. Nubia says that the camera offers 16 different modes other than pro and normal modes. The dual rear camera combines multi-view and dynamic features to create an interactive 3D motion picture.
Connectivity options include Bluetooth 4.2, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n/ac, GPS, GLONASS, and USB Type-C port. The company says that the smartphone supports 2.4G/5G dual-band WiFi, with upload speeds reaching 430Mbps. The Nubia Z17 mini is fitted with a 2950mAh non-removable battery and measures at 7.45mm in thickness. It is offered with 64GB of inbuilt storage, which is expandable via microSD card (up to 200GB). It sports an accelerometer, ambient light sensor, gyroscope, and proximity sensor. It measures 146.65×72.5×7.45mm and weighs 155 grams

“Nubia is committed to setting new performance standards with every product and inspire creative expression of India’s next generation. We are committed to drive and deliver changes in mobile photography across the globe and in India, with Nubia Z17 mini we are raising the bar high for a mobile phone camera and are confident that users across India will accept and appreciate the device,” said Eric Hu, Country Head, Nubia India.

 

Sony Xperia XZ Premium Launched in India: Price, Release Date Specifications, and More

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The smartphone was first launched at MWC 2017
  • The company has brought the dual-SIM variant to India
  • Sony appears to have shaken OnePlus’ claim to first mover title

Perhaps in a move to preempt OnePlus and its claim of being the first to launch a Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 smartphone in India, Sony on Thursday launched its flagship Xperia XZ Premium in India. Available from June 12, the Xperia XZ Premium price in India is Rs. 59,990 (best buy price). It will be available from Sony Center, select retail outlets, and Amazon India.

Pre-bookings for the Sony Xperia XZ Premium begin on Friday, June 2, and go on till June 11. Customers who pre-book will get a Sony SRS-XB20 Wireless Bluetooth Speaker worth Rs. 8,990 for free. The company is also bundling a 3-month subscription to Sony LIV worth Rs. 349 for free for all buyers, as well as Gameloft’s Modern Combat 5 with 5,200 in-game credits.

First unveiled at MWC 2017, the Sony Xperia XZ Premium has another highlight feature apart from its top-end Snapdragon 835 SoC – its camera. The smartphone sports a 19-megapixel Motion Eye camera with a 1/2.3-inch Exmor RS memory stacked sensor that’s capable of shooting videos at 960 frames per second. It also offers predictive hybrid autofocus and predictive capture features. Other highlights include a 25mm f/2.0 lens, and 1.22-micron pixel sensor.

As for the front camera, the Sony Xperia XZ Premium has a 13-megapixel 1/3.06-inch Exmor RS sensor that’s coupled with 22mm wide-angle f/2.0 lens. The company is touting its SteadyShot technology for both cameras, with 5-axis stabilisation. Another highlight is dust and water resistance with an IP65/68 rating, as well as the use of Corning Gorilla Glass 5 on both the front and back of the smartphone.

Sony has launched the dual-SIM (Nano-SIM) variant of the XZ Premium in India, and it runs Android 7.1 Nougat. It sports a 5.5-inch 4K (2160×3840 pixels) HDR Triluminos display with an sRGB 138 percent spectrum and the X-Reality for Mobile display engine.

As we mentioned, the Sony Xperia XZ Premium is powered by the octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 SoC, coupled with 4GB of RAM. The phone packs 64GB of inbuilt storage that can be expanded via microSD card (up to 256GB). Connectivity options include 4G VoLTE, Wi-Fi 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0, NFC, GPS/ A-GPS, USB Type-C (3.1), and a 3.5mm audio jack.Sony Xperia XZ Premium Launched in India: Price, Release Date Specifications, and More

It is powered by a 3230mAh non-removable battery with Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0 technology, measures 156x77x7.9mm, and weighs 191 grams. Sensors on the phone include accelerometer, ambient light sensor, barometer, digital compass, gyroscope, and proximity sensor.

Sony Xperia XZ Premium

Sony Xperia XZ Premium

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

5.50-inch

Processor

octa-core

Front Camera

13-megapixel

Resolution

2160×3840 pixels

RAM

4GB

OS

Android 7.0

Storage

64GB

Rear Camera

19-megapixel

Battery Capacity

3230mAh

Also See
  • Samsung Galaxy S8+ (Maple Gold, 64GB, 4GB RAM) – OFFER
    Rs. 64,900
  • SAMSUNG Galaxy S8 (Maple Gold, 64GB, 4GB RAM) – OFFER
    Rs. 57,900
  • Apple iPhone 7 (Red, 128GB) –
    Rs. 61,990

Sony’s New G-Series Solid State Drives for Professional Video Recorders Launched in India

 

HIGHLIGHTS
The SSDs come with 10 years of lifespan
The new drives have data protection technology
The new G-series drives offer read speeds up to 550Mbps
Sony on Thursday launched its new G-series solid state drives, SV-GS96 and SV-GS48, in India. The new SSDs from the company are meant for the storage needs of professional video recorders and will be made available in the third week of May. The SV-GS96 SSD comes with a storage capacity of 960GB and SV-GS48 comes with 480GB of storage. The storage drives have been priced at Rs. 47,500 and Rs. 25,500 respectively.

The new G-series solid state drives achieve read speeds up to 550Mbps and have been claimed to have 10 years of lifespan, as per company’s claims. “Using Sony’s Error Correction Code technology, the 960GB G Series SSD achieves up to 2400 TBW (terabytes written), while the 460GB drive can reach 1200 TBW, resulting in less frequent replacement and increased ROI. 2400 TBW translates to about 10 years of use for the SV-GS96, if data is fully written to the drive and average of five times per week,” the company said in its release.Sony's New G-Series Solid State Drives for Professional Video Recorders Launched in India

Notably, Sony says that while data write speeds usually drop suddenly for other SSDs after repeated re-write cycles, the new G-series drives feature a built-in technology that prevent these speeds from slowing down.
The SV-GS96 and SV-GS48 storage drives come with data protection technology that has been claimed to keep the content secure and intact, even in case of sudden power failures.

“Building on the reliability synonymous with Sony’s Professional Media products, the new SSDs are a solid option for respective video recorders, offering videographers stable high-speed capabilities, a sense of security and lower cost of ownership due to their longer life,” the company said.

The new Sony G-series solid state drives will be made available across all Sony Center and other major electronic stores across India. Further, the drives will come with 10 years of warranty from the company.

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Tags: Sony G-series SSD Launch, SV-GS96, SV-GS48, Sony SSD Launch, Solid State Drives, Cameras, Entertainment, India

 

This week in games: Mass Effect’s downfall, CD Projekt’s extortion, E3 rumors and more

 

E3 starts…tomorrow, so the “wrap-up” part of our weekly news wrap-up is more of a theoretical end to the week than anything else. We’ll be here at 12 p.m. Pacific on Saturday to start our coverage of EA’s press conference, and then it’s six days of straight gaming from there. If our E3 expectations and predictions come true, Microsoft will show off more Scorpio, Ubisoft will dump another Assassin’s Creed on us, and on, and on.

This week leading up to it was all about the teases, the trailers, and the leaks. It looks like we’ll see an XCOM 2 expansion soon, Hideo Kojima dropped a cryptic Death Stranding tease, and…there’s a new Bubsy?

In non-E3 news, there’s a scathing indictment of Mass Effect: Andromeda’s development woes, courtesy of Kotaku. Sources claim most of the game was developed in just the last eighteen months, and there’s more dirt where that came from.

This is gaming news for June 5 through 9.

Downtime

Determined not to watch any E3 coverage this weekend? Or maybe you’re just looking for something to do between press conferences? This weekend Chivalry follow-up Mirage: Arcane Warfare is free-to-try on Steam—a bit of a bad omen, considering the game released two weeks ago. Also not a surprising omen given the game launched with zero buzz whatsoever.

If you’ve got money to throw around, there’s also the GOG Summer Sale—first of the season, even though “summer” doesn’t properly start for another week. Some pretty great deals going on, and any purchase nets you a copy of Rebel Galaxy for free.

 

OnePlus 5 India Launch: Pop-Up Events to Be Held in New Delhi, Hyderabad, Bengaluru, Chennai

 

HIGHLIGHTS
OnePlus 5 pop-up events will be held on June 23 and June 24
Limited number of OnePlus 5 units will be up for purchase at the events
Anyone can attend the pop-up events
The OnePlus 5 India launch event is less than 10 days away, and the company has now announced it will hold pop-up events in four cities in the country right after launch to showcase its newest flagship to the general public. The India launch of the upcoming OnePlus flagship is scheduled for June 22, and the first pop-up event will be held in New Delhi the next day. On June 24, OnePlus will host pop-up events to bring the OnePlus 5 to the public in Hyderabad, Bengaluru, and Chennai that will allow users to experience the handset and buy it.

OnePlus 5 pop-up events will also be held in New York, Paris, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, and London after the launch on June 20, when the phone is unveiled globally. The company held similar events last year for the launch of OnePlus 3 as well.OnePlus 5 India Launch: Pop-Up Events to Be Held in New Delhi, Hyderabad, Bengaluru, Chennai

Coming back to the OnePlus 5 pop-up event, the company’s official website says, “Everyone is invited. But, to be among the first ones to take home the OnePlus 5, you’ll have to be fast (limited stocks).” The Delhi event will start at 1pm IST and end at 9pm, the one in Bengaluru is scheduled for 12:30pm-10pm, and Chennai and Hyderabad for 3pm-9pm. Details of the venue are available on the OnePlus website.
The OnePlus 5 India launch event will start at 2pm IST on June 22. According to a recent report, the OnePlus 5 variant with 64GB storage and 6GB RAM will cost Rs. 32,999, while the model with 128GB storage and 8GB RAM will be priced at Rs. 37,999. The smartphone has been confirmed to feature the top-end Snapdragon 835 processor, iPhone 7 Plus-like design, and dual-camera setup on the back, based on various teasers the company has shared till now.

OnePlus 5 Price in India, Specifications, Release Date, and More: What the Rumour Mill Says

Rumours suggest the OnePlus 5 will run Android 7.1 Nougat software at launch, and sport a 5.5-inch full-HD display, with a fingerprint sensor below. It is said to run on Android 7.1 Nougat out-of-the-box. The smartphone is said to sport a 23-megapixel rear camera and a 16-megapixel camera at the front for selfies. As the device sports a dual camera setup at the back, how does 23-megapixel sensor fits in the scheme of things is currently unclear.

 

Video: HTC U11 doesn’t hold up well in bend test

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Whenever a new smartphone is launched, the world waits for a durability test from popular YouTube channel, JerryRigEverything. Until now, Zach from JerryRigEverything has taken certain flagships through his rigorous durability tests, including the Samsung Galaxy S8 and Xiaomi Mi 6. Now, HTC’s latest flagship is the latest smartphone to go through his tests and it comes out with unexpected results.

The HTC U11’s body is made of a glass-metal combo and that does not sound very assuring on paper. However, HTC has perfected the art of making phones with glass panels that can undergo drops and bends impressively, like Samsung. That explains the reason why the HTC U11 was able to keep its rear glass intact in the bend test, even though the front glass panel shattered. It seems that the functional surfaces of HTC U11 are prone to scratches and shatters whereas decorative surfaces like the rear panel hold up quite well. HTC’s latest flagship is the latest smartphone to go through his tests and it comes out with unexpected results.

The reason we say that because, like the front panel that shattered, the ‘Edge Sense’ side frame was also prone to extreme bending. The metal frame provides a limited structural support to the handset, thus deforming the U11 under some stress. The front display panel is also subject to scratches from sand particles while being unaffected from coins and other stuff that stay in pockets.

While the U11 doesn’t hold up as well as the Galaxy S8, considering the Samsung flagship has more delicate glass surfaces than the U11, the U11’s Edge Sense frame needs some kind of structural strengthening, which we hope that HTC could come up with during the life cycle of the U11.