Remove obstructions from roads, orders L-G

 

Delhi Lieutenant-Governor Anil Baijal on Tuesday directed authorities to remove encroachments on 29 major roads.

These roads include the stretch from ITO to Vikas Marg, M. B. Road cut to IGNOU crossing, Khajuri Chowk to Chilla border on Pusa Road, Nizamuddin to Badarpur Flyover on Mathura Road, Aurobindo Marg, C.D.R. Chowk to petrol pump on Mehrauli-Gurgaon Road, Sarita Vihar red light to Kalindi Kunj Flyover, Chirag Dilli crossing to Savitri Flyover and Vijay Nagar to Burari.

The L-G also asked all civic bodies to crackdown on temporary encroachments such as parked vehicles, and penalise contractors of local bodies who were allowing such parking on roads.

The decision was taken at a high-level meeting chaired by Mr. Baijal and attended by Public Works Department Minister Satyendar Jain, Chief Secretary M.M. Kutty and Special Commissioner of Police (Traffic) Ajay Kashyap.

 Image result for lg

Three-week deadline

The move comes within a week of the Delhi High Court ordering removal of encroachment from pavements on a permanent basis.

The L-G has directed each agency concerned to draw up an action plan within three days to remove encroachment from roads. He also ordered that removal of encroachments and road blocks be videographed.

Mr. Baijal directed all agencies to finish the work within three weeks.

“The L-G directed the Urban Development Department to be the nodal department by creating a special cell, which will monitor stretch-wise action taken by the local bodies on a weekly basis,” the L-G Office said in a statement.

Deal: LG G6 is $150 off in the US

If you are in the US and planning to purchase the LG G6, you might want to check out the deal Amazon is offering: unlocked variant (black and platinum color options) for $549.99.

That is down $150 from the $699.99 price tag the device usually carries there. Officially also, LG has the unlocked variant listed for $700.

The model on offer is compatible with both GSM and CDMA networks, meaning you can use it on all major US carriers including AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon. No information on when the deal ends. For more details, head to the Source link below.

 

LG V30 Launch to Be Held Ahead of IFA 2017: Report

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The phone has been tipped to pack Snapdragon 835 SoC
  • LG has been tipped to hold pre-order sales for smartphone
  • LG V30 is expected to come with IP68 water and dust resistance

Last month, leaked LG V30 mockups suggested that the smartphone could possibly feature a secondary slide-out display and now the handset has been tipped to launch in September this year. The LG V30 will reportedly be unveiled right ahead of IFA 2017 event, which will kick off in Berlin on September 1.

According to a report by South Korean news website ETNews, for the first time for a handset in its V-Series, LGwill be launching the V30 smartphone ahead of IFA 2017 event in Germany. Apart from this, LG is also planning to hold pre-order sales for V30 in South Korea, which will also be a first for any phone from V-Series, in an attempt to promote V30, as per the report.

LG has been tipped to hold pre-order sales for “about a week or two” via three South Korean mobile network providers after the launch event of V30. ETNews has suggested that the smartphone will be officially released in South Korea during September. Notably, the report has not mentioned whether there will be pre-order sales for other markets as well.LG V30 Launch to Be Held Ahead of IFA 2017: Report

The South Korean news website says that LG V30 is expected to be priced by the company around “latter end of KRW 800,000 (roughly Rs. 45,200).” As per the report, LG V30 comes with a near bezel-less design just like the company’s current flagship LG G6 and will feature a dual-camera setup at the back just like its predecessor LG V20. The smartphone has been suggested to house a 3200mAh battery as well. It has been tipped to be powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 SoC and come with IP68 water and dust resistance rating.

In audio department, LG V30 has been suggested to come with ESS’ new Quad DAC, which should allow it to deliver impressive performance. Notably, the phone has been tipped to retain the 3.5mm audio jack as well. Finally, LG V30 is expected to be offered in 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB storage options.

To recall, LG has previously been tipped to use OLED display on LG V30 and “old-ish” mockups have suggested that the early designs of the smartphone included a slide-out secondary display as well.

As these are just leaks, we would advise you to take this information with a pinch of salt on the side and wait for the official information from the company.

 

LG G6 mini aka LG Q6 Said to Forgo Dual Rear Camera Setup

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • LG likely to launch G6 mini variant as LG Q6
  • The launch may happen later this year
  • LG Q6 said to sport an aspect ratio of 18.5:9

A new report claims that LG has plans to launch a “mini” variant of its flagship G6 smartphone as the LG G6 mini. Citing an internal document, TechnoBuffalo reports that the new device will retain LG G6’s biggest highlight – an 18:9 (or 2:1) display aspect ratio. Further, the document suggests that the LG G6 mini, which might not be the name of the device when it launches, will feature a 5.4-inch screen which is smaller than the 5.7-inch seen on the LG G6 (Review).LG G6 mini aka LG Q6 Said to Forgo Dual Rear Camera Setup

Prolific tipster Evan Blass, however, has claimed that the device will be unveiled as LG Q6. Blass has also added that the device was recently spotted on FCC with model number M700 and sports an aspect ratio of 18.5:9 – like the Samsung Galaxy S8+. He also claimed that LG Q6 will sport a single 13-megapixel rear camera and 3GB of RAM.

Unfortunately, there are not many details available on the Internet around the LG Q6 aka LG G6 mini at the moment.

The document obtained is dated back to early last year which makes Technobuffalo believe that the device in question may have been scrapped. Though, however, the tip from Blass seemingly confirms the existence of the LG Q6. A device with smaller form factor and features like LG G6 could bring the company sales volumes, as the smartphone would be available at much lower rate.

LG has been rumoured to be working on a OLED panel for its next V30 premium smartphone. The move to OLED panels is said to be a way to match Samsung in the smartphone market. A recent report even claimed that the LG V30 will reportedly be unveiled right ahead of IFA 2017 trade show, which will kick off in Berlin on September 1.

 

LG Pay Coming to Low-End Smartphones, More Markets in 2018

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • LG Pay service to be available on more LG phones
  • The service was limited to LG G6 so far
  • The company has also confirmed service expansion to more markets

LG’s mobile payments service, LG Pay, is all set to expand to more smartphones and new markets next year. The company has finally confirmed its plan which means that LG’s new payment service will go head-on with rival services like Samsung Pay and Apple Pay in international markets.

The company has revealed plans to bring its LG Pay service to “low-budget smartphones” next year. Apart from affordable mobiles, the service is also said to expand to online shopping malls. To recall, the LG Pay mobile payments service was launched in South Korea last month.

LG Pay uses Wireless Magnetic Communication technology unlike Magnetic Secure Transmission technology used by rival service Samsung Pay (which also supports NFC). Apple Pay only supports NFC.LG Pay Coming to Low-End Smartphones, More Markets in 2018

“We will expand the use of LG Pay into low-budget smartphones alongside premium phones next year,” Cho Jun-ho, President of LG’s Mobile Communication Division was quoted saying at an event in South Korea. Unfortunately, the company is yet to announce the smartphones that will get the support for its LG Pay service.

The report adds that the number of LG Pay users stood at 95,000 compared to Samsung Pay’s 5.2 million users citing a local research firm Wiseapp.

As announced before, the LG Pay service is supported by the company’s flagship, the LG G6. Now, the South Korean giant had said that it would expand the service to more devices.

The LG Pay service requires the user’s fingerprint for every single transaction and thereby has been claimed to improve security while transacting.

 

LG V30 Render Leak Tips Dual Camera Setup, Rear Fingerprint Scanner

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • LG V30 is expected to launch ahead of IFA
  • The smartphone is tipped to sport a glass back
  • It will come with a 3.5mm audio jack at the top edge

After the LG G6, the company is now gearing up to launch its next flagship smartphone this fall. The LG V30 has been leaked on multiple occasions previously, but today’s leak brings video and image renders of the smartphone, giving us a full blown look at it from all angles.

Tipster OnLeaks in collaboration with MySmartPrice has leaked the renders of the LG V30 smartphone, and the device sports a sleek metal frame, with a glass back. At the front, the smartphone is seen sporting very thin bezels with no Home Button or navigation buttons for that matter. There is no secondary display seen on the LG V30 renders, but LG could embed it before launch.

 LG V30 Render Leak Tips Dual Camera Setup, Rear Fingerprint Scanner

At the bottom edge, we can the speaker grille, and the USB Type-C port as well. The 3.5mm audio jack is situated at the top edge, while the volume keys sit on the left, and the power button sits on the right edge of the smartphone. The back seems to be made of glass, and the tipster also suggests the introduction of wireless charging.

The renders indicate a dual camera setup sitting horizontally in the centre, with the flash beside it. Right below it is the fingerprint scanner, and the LG V30 logo is printed at the bottom of the device. The dimensions of the phone are tipped to be roughly at 151.4×75.2×7.4 mm, and the display may be at 6-inches.

Previous leaks indicate that LG V30 may adopt an OLED display, and early mockups indicate that it may even have a slide-out secondary display. The LG V30 may reportedly be unveiled right ahead of IFA 2017 event, which will kick off in Berlin on September 1. Furthermore, the LG V30 is expected to be priced by the company around latter end of KRW 800,000 (roughly Rs. 45,200).

The smartphone has been rumoured to house a 3200mAh battery as well. It has been tipped to be powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 SoC and come with IP68 water and dust resistance rating. In audio department, LG V30 has been rumoured to come with ESS’ new Quad DAC, which should allow it to deliver impressive performance. Finally, LG V30 is expected to be offered in 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB storage options.

 

With Google Pixel 2 And V30, LG Phones Are Going OLED

 

LG’s OLED tunnel at CES 2017. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Last year when I visited LG headquarters in Seoul, I asked LG mobile’s product team leader Ian Hwang a question that has been on Android geek’s minds: why haven’t LG phones gone with OLED screens yet? After all, tech geeks prefer OLED panels to LCD (iPhone 8 is finally making the jump too, by the way), and LG is the biggest player in the OLED television market (Samsung, in fact, doesn’t even sell OLED televisions, instead using a similar sounding tech named QLED). Heck, LG even provided OLED panels for the Apple Watch.

While the guys at LG Mobile couldn’t say too much on the record, they did imply that the decision came down to LG Display (a different department), which at the time wanted to focus on “large panels,” like for televisions. Well, going by the latest rounds of rumors and leaks and off-the-record talks with insiders, it would appear that LG will finally make the jump this fall with the LG V30 and the Pixel 2. The latter device, of course, is “Google’s phone,” and while no official announcement has been made, it’s an open secret among phone geeks that LG will be making the phone for Google. In fact, if you follow phone news, you have surely already seen Android Police’s render of the Pixel 2 based on leaked intel, showing a device that looks very much like the LG G6.

A render of the Google Pixel 2 by Android Police, a site that accurately leaked the Pixel 1's look a year ago.

Android Police

A render of the Google Pixel 2 by Android Police, a site that accurately leaked the Pixel 1’s look a year ago.

That’s definitely good news, because looking like the G6 means the new Pixel have drastically trimmed the hilariously large bezels of the Pixel 1 (which I’ve called out extensively, because I think putting out a phone with that huge a chin in late 2016 was inexcusable by a major company). The Pixel 2, according to Android Police (which accurately leaked the look of the Pixel 1 last year), will definitely rock an LG-made OLED panel, which even has the same 18:9 aspect ratio that LG and Samsung pioneered earlier this year (Chinese phones will surely go this route with the next generation of phones coming 2018). This means LG Displays is producing small OLED screens now, likely with enough supplies for the V30, G7 and perhaps the 2018 iPhone if rumors are true.

The V30 will almost certainly be unveiled on August 31 at the IFA trade show in Berlin. Now LG hasn’t officially “confirmed” the news on the record, but it sent an image with a V to tech journos asking them to save the date. Looking at the carefully crafted image, one could already deduce that the V30 will have the same 18:9 aspect ratio as the G6 (and Pixel 2), along with rounded corners. If you look carefully at the V, it seems to show the shape of a very, very slim bezel too. Could the V30 be nearly bezel-less like the Xiaomi Mi Mix?

The image that was sent to tech journalists by LG on July 13.

LG

The image that was sent to tech journalists by LG on July 13.

For the longest time, tech blogs would do their “Galaxy Vs. G”/”Note Vs. V” posts and immediately give the edge to Samsung in the “Display” section because of OLED. LG, which is a world leader in OLED screen tech, is saying “enough.”

 

LG Q6 brings edge-to-edge screen, facial recognition to the masses

 

LG’s new Q-family of phones — that includes the Q6 Alpha, the Q6 and the Q6 Plus — brings the G6’s marquee feature to the masses. If you’ve liked — I know I did — the G6 and its big screen that fits, chances are, you’ll be right at home with LG’s new Q-series phones. Even more so, if you’re someone on a tight budget. Although the company is yet to make the Q6 Alpha, the Q6 and the Q6 Plus officially official in terms of pricing and availability, it has gone on record to say that all these phones will be competitively priced. That besides the fact that the G6 is now selling in India for as low as Rs 40,000. It was initially launched at Rs 51,990.

LG had been silently working on an affordable G6 — previously tipped to be called as the G6 Mini — for quite sometime now. India Today Tech had previously reported that the G6 Mini was in fact in the works and that it would launch in India sometime in August-September. “Very soon India will see a variant of the G6 at a much more affordable price,” Amit Gujral who is head corporate marketing, LG Electronics India had said while speaking exclusively with India Today Tech in May. “We have always brought marquee features in our flagships and we have gone ahead, made much more efforts by our R&D to bring those features into slightly lower mid-end segment,” he had further said.

 LG’s Full Vision display when combined with the company’s Android Nougat-based UX 6.0 software allows users to run apps in two perfectly square windows side by sideLG Q6 brings edge-to-edge screen, facial recognition to the masses

In line with our report, LG has now announced that it will launch its Q-family of phones in Asian markets — that includes India — in August. And, much in line with our report, the Q-family of phones indeed ships with the G6’s USP feature. All the three phones come with an unusual 18:9 Full Vision display — instead of a regular 16:9 — much like the G6. All the three phones come with ridiculously slim bezels allowing the display to take up over 80 per cent of their front side: a concept also seen in Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are however a lot more curvier in comparison, and also they offer more screen-to-body ratio — an 83 per cent — than LG’s phones.

LG’s Full Vision display when combined with the company’s Android Nougat-based UX 6.0 software allows users to run apps in two perfectly square windows side by side. The feature, which seems to be a gradual progression of Android Nougat’s split-screen multitasking capabilities, has been extended to the camera software as well.

The camera app in the case of the Q-Family comes with a specialised Square mode that has been designed to make best use of the phones’ one-of-a-kind aspect ratio. It will allow users to take a picture and then simultaneously review the same in a square — 1:1 — identical to the one offered by the view-finder. All in one go: which means, what you (will) see is what you (will) get. The feature will particularly be useful for uploading snaps to social media channels like Instagram.

But because the Q-Family of phones has been designed for the mid-level segment, there is obviously some cost cutting. Unlike the G6, the Q6 Alpha, the Q6 and the Q6 Plus come with a 5.5-inch screen with a 2160×1080 pixel resolution. Although all the three phones boast of 7000 series aluminum and a shock-dispersing design there are missing out on the G6’s signature built like a tank quality. They haven’t gone through Military-grade MIL-STD 810G tests, neither are they IP68 certified for dust and water resistance. They don’t even have a fingerprint scanner, for crying out loud, although you do get facial recognition tech for cheap.

All the three phones skip the G6’s dual-camera gimmickry and instead ship with a single 13-megapixel camera on the rear alongside a 5-megapixel camera with a ‘wide’ field of view on the front.

All the three phones are powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 435 processor and are backed by a 3,000mAh battery. While the Q6 Alpha ships with 2GB RAM and 16GB storage, the Q6 and the Q6 Plus come with 3GB RAM/32GB storage and 4GB RAM/64GB storage.

 

LG G4, V10 to Reportedly Receive Android 7.0 Nougat Update This Year

 

South Korean electronics major LG will update two of its smartphone models – the G4 and V10 – with the latest operating system (OS).

LG plans to offer the upgrade of the OS with Android 7.0 for the V10 in the second half of this year and for the G4 in the third quarter, Yonhap news agency reported on Saturday.

The schedule applies to phones sold in South Korea, with consumers abroad to be notified of a separate schedule later.LG G4, V10 to Reportedly Receive Android 7.0 Nougat Update This Year

The G4, which debuted in April 2015, had its OS updated twice. The V10 was released in October the year and also has had two OS updates. But LG had announced plans to discontinue updates, saying the phones are not optimised with the latest version.

Kicking off an era of premium smartphones with the unique 18:9 screen aspect ratio, LG introduced the G6 at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) this year in Barcelona, Spain that features a bold new display format complemented by a cinematic viewing experience.

The device has Google Assistant built-in, empowering users to get quick answers, manage everyday tasks, enjoy the best music and videos and search G6 more efficiently than ever.

LG G6 Review: Righting The Course Of Mobile Gadget Development

After the disappointing sales of the G5, South Korean tech giant LG is back with a radically redesigned G6.

In the history of consumer electronics, there’s been one constant: as technology advances, gadgets always get smaller and more compact. The last three years, when smartphones actually became increasingly bigger, was an anomaly. An odd blip on the radar. The biggest phonemakers in the world will spend 2017 fixing that problem. Later this year, both Samsung and Apple will release phones with drastically smaller bodies (while keeping the same screen size, or even expanding it) than last year’s models, and mainstream consumers will go gaga.

But this piece isn’t about them. It’s about LG, because once again, South Korea’s other chaebol (aka conglomerate) has beaten everybody to the punch with the new industry trend. The LG G6 is the most compact big screen phone ever made. It’s got a 5.7-inch display but the phone is significantly smaller than phones with 5.5-inch displays. Forget a minor bump in processing power or embellished tales about the importance of A.I. assistant in phones (this will be important a few years down the line, but as of right now the tech isn’t ready – Google Assistant is highly overrated, which I’ll get to later in this review), the big thing you’d want in smartphones this year is slimmer bezels, because that allows you to one-hand use the phone easier, without sacrificing screen real estate. The smartphone industry is finally going in the right direction again: phones are going to get smaller.

Like a G6.

Ben Sin

Like a G6.

The back of the G6 is made of glass.

Ben Sin

The back of the G6 is made of glass.

The 5.7-inch on the G6 is, just like previous LG phones, a QUAD HD (1440 x 2880) IPS LCD panel. That means colors are accurate and brightness gets very high, but the blacks are not as deep and the contrast not as punchy as AMOLED displays on Huawei’s Mate 9 Pro or Samsung’s Galaxy phones. If you’ve used previous LG flagships, you know what to expect here — this is still a strong, brilliant display. What is new about this display is it has an aspect ratio of 18:9, aka 2:1. This is slightly longer/wider (depending on if you’re in portrait or landscape mode) than almost all other smartphone displays, which are 16:9. That extra real estate means it’ll display more content, and when using Android Nougat’s multi-tasking split-screen mode, the two apps fit into a perfect square that makes them easier to use.

The G6 phone is great at multi-tasking.

Ben Sin

The G6 phone is great at multi-tasking.

LG says the 18:9 aspect ratio isn’t just about being able to read a couple extra lines of text in news articles, but that it was designed with a cinematic feel in mind. Though most videos are shot in 16:9 aspect ratio, there is an increasing amount of content out there, including some new Netflix shows, that are shot with an 18:9 aspect ratio. In fact, Damien Chazelle, a big film buff, shot La La Land in extra wide CinemaScope film, which makes that perhaps the most famous example of a “cinematic experience” that could be enjoyed fully on the G6 more than other phones. Is a wider display really that big of a deal on a mobile device? I’d argue no. But for what it’s worth, Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and S8+ are both likely going with that same aspect ratio. So if anything 18:9/2:1 is perhaps the future of Android displays. Just remember LG did it first.

Moving onto the device’s build. The G6 is surprisingly and weirdly straight and flat, especially for a phone in 2017, when everyone else, including Apple, is copying Samsung’s dual-curved display. (There’s actually a reason LG refrained from going that route, as I wrote here) The phone is made of glass and aluminum, of which personally I’m not a huge fan. I think the glass back thing that is most famously done on Samsung phones look great out of the box for about two seconds, and then it immediately attracts all types of oil and lint and fingerprints. The matte metal back of the LG V20 looks far more appealing to me than the G6’s glass back, but whatever — that’s just my opinion.

I had to wipe this phone down with a cloth before every shot because the shiny glossy back so easily looks like a greasy teenager's face.

Ben Sin

I had to wipe this phone down with a cloth before every shot because the shiny glossy back so easily looks like a greasy teenager’s face.

The phone is also surprisingly thicker than most other phones at 7.9 dimensions, but it's still a very comfortable phone to hold.

Ben Sin

The phone is also surprisingly thicker than most other phones at 7.9 dimensions, but it’s still a very comfortable phone to hold.

The fingerprint sensor on the back activates upon touch (without the need to press down on the home button), but isn’t as accurate or fast as Huawei’s fingerprint reader. That’s not a major knock — Huawei’s fingerprint reader speed/accuracy is so far ahead of everyone else it’s jarring — the G6’s sensor is about on par with the ones found on the iPhone or Samsung Galaxy S7. Just don’t expect to get the phone to unlock on the first go if your finger is oily or slightly wet.

But, as I wrote last week, LG’s software has a great solution for times when you don’t want to or can’t use the fingerprint reader. The Knock Code is a genius software touch that lets me unlock the phone with relative ease by tapping a sequence of codes on the display. This is significantly faster than unlocking via PIN input, so the G6 is that one phone with a rear fingerprint reader that’s still usable while sitting flat on its back.

About that LG software … I’ve long been in the camp that thought LG’s UI is fine, and that the complaints from the tech geeks community is overblown. The skin here on top of Android 7.0 is clean and minimalistic, with my only complaint being that the app icons are a bit boring/vanilla compared to stock Android icons. Still, there are ways to fix that, which I did on my device.

My G6 icons are more in line with stock Android icons than the square-ish vanilla LG icons. Also notice how the G6 is only a little bit bigger than the iPhone 7 despite having a much larger display. That's the power of slim bezels.

Ben Sin

My G6 icons are more in line with stock Android icons than the square-ish vanilla LG icons. Also notice how the G6 is only a little bit bigger than the iPhone 7 despite having a much larger display. That’s the power of slim bezels.

That extra tall display with slim bezels make the screen very immersive.

Ben Sin

That extra tall display with slim bezels make the screen very immersive.

Back in January I broke the news that the G6 would run on Snapdragon 821 instead of the absolutely newest Snapdragon 835, and so far the G6 has been running super smooth despite the “older” chipset. LG reps have been saying publicly and privately that the “war for specs” is over, that they don’t stress too much about having the most megapixels or processing power. This is of course partly marketing speak — part of the reason they opted for the 821 was so they could get the G6 out before the Galaxy S8 — but there is truth to it. I don’t see how the Snapdragon 835 can improve much on the 821 in terms of basic day to day Facebooking or email writing. Plus Huawei’s Kirin 960 trumps everybody. I’ll bet money the Snapdragon 835 isn’t topping the P10 in raw benchmark scores.

With the G6, you get a feeling that LG wanted to clean its hands of the G5, because the former is so different that it’s almost like the antithesis of latter. But one thing that is returning from the G5 (and the V20) is the dual-camera set-up. Everyone is doing the two camera thing these days, but I like LG’s implementation the best. Huawei’s dual-Leica lens that can take bokeh shots is cool (Huawei did this before the iPhone, by the way), but the G6’s wide-angle lens is actually practical, because it allows you to capture images you normally couldn’t. Here’s a perfect example: after the Mobile World Congress I took a short trip to Rome. When I was checking out the Roman forum’s headless statues, I notice that most visitors had a hard time capturing the statues from a straight-on angle because there was a barrier preventing the photographer from stepping back too far. Have a look below.

The barriers are maybe for to five feet from the statues.

Ben Sin

The barriers are maybe for to five feet from the statues.

Notice how there wasn’t a lot of room to back up to capture a full shot? But with the G6’s wide-angle lens, I was able to capture both statues head on (pun intended).

no Samsung Galaxy, Google Pixel or iPhone could have gotten this shot from this angle.

Ben Sin

no Samsung Galaxy, Google Pixel or iPhone could have gotten this shot from this angle.

Here’s another example, I stitched two shots of my friend’s dinner table side by side, with the left being a normal shot and the right a wide-angle shot. With any other phone, you’d have to stand on a chair to get the entire table and the guests like that.

Normal lens (left); wide angle lens (right).

Ben Sin

Normal lens (left); wide angle lens (right).